David Servant takes you inside Hezbollah-controlled southern Lebanon…

01Feb

David Servant takes you inside Hezbollah-controlled southern Lebanon…

As Becky and I passed through the checkpoint into southern Lebanon last month, it occurred to me that I had good reason to pray. Southern Lebanon is controlled by Hezbollah, a powerful terrorist organization that has been providing military support to Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad's current war against his own citizens. We were, in fact, entering Hezbollah's turf to pass out relief supplies to some of the one million Syrian refugees who have fled their nation's civil war.

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24Jan

The Softer Side of Islam [A Special Report from David Servant in Lebanon]

A Syrian mother of five, who was abandoned by her husband, and who is blind. Her oldest daughter, in this photo, age 12, serves as […]

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01Jun

14 Kakuma Kids

Abraham Atem was just a boy when he arrived at Kakuma, a Swahili word meaning "nowhere," and also the name of the refugee camp in northwestern Kenya that would become his home. His parents had been massacred by northern Sudanese soldiers, two casualties among an eventual two million who would forfeit their lives in Sudan's civil war. Fleeing for his life along with thousands of other orphaned children who are now known as Sudan's "Lost Boys," Abraham walked more than 1,000 miles to reach safety in Kakuma. It was 1992.

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01Feb

Internally Displaced with Sufficient Grace

To Burma's military leaders who have been trying to suppress Kachin State's independence movement for five decades, she is a woman who hardly exists, a mere speck of dust on their political chessboard. To soldiers in the Kachin Independence Army, she is just one of forty thousand frightened people who have recently fled from their villages to escape fresh fighting. To her husband, a pastor, she is the wife whom he has seen only twice in the past four months, as he, like most other Kachin men in the war zone, has remained behind to protect his crops. To the thirty women and children with whom she sleeps each night on the wooden floor of their common room at Jan Mai Refugee Camp, Htulum Sumlut is a godsend, a light in their darkness.

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