Problem Pastor

01Mar

Problem Pastor

Today our team drove into the mountains of Burundi to visit some Heaven's Family-sponsored national missionaries, distribute food to some very poor believers, place a chlorine-generating water purifier in a village where the water is making almost everyone sick, meet some micro-loan beneficiaries, and interview church planters who need bicycles to take the gospel further. We also met a pastor whom I inadvertently caused to lose his job. His name is Gregoire Bizimana. Let me tell you the story.

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01Mar

A Fish Sister

Many Westerners know something about the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, when 800,000 people were slaughtered during three months of ethnic cleansing. Very few, however, know that the Rwandan genocide fueled two major wars in the neighboring nation of the Democratic Republic of Congo. The second war, which began in 1998, involved seven foreign armies, and it directly and indirectly resulted in the deaths of 5.5 million people. That made it the world’s deadliest conflict since World War II, yet it has been largely ignored by the rest of the world, a hidden holocaust that is not over yet.

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01Mar

Ruliba Cleanwater Revival

Today was a long one, as we worked to make the most of our only full day in Kigali, Rwanda's capital. In the morning, Chuck, Teryl and I ministered at a conference for 200 Rwandan pastors who were interested in learning about house churches. In the afternoon, we distributed $1,000 worth of corn flour, potatoes and beans, courtesy of our Food Fund, to 53 very needy Christian families who had been selected by their pastors. By late afternoon, everyone on our team was tired, but we had one more stop, a very poor village on the outskirts of Kigali named Ruliba. It would prove to be worth our drive.

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01Mar

Dancing with God’s Stars

Today was our sixth day in Kenya. Yesterday, half of us flew north to the town of Lodwar, which sits in the heart of an area populated by Turkana tribespeople. Their region is generally arid, but it hasn't rained here in eight months, so living conditions are even more challenging than normal. The Turkana survive as small-scale goat and camel herders, and their livestock is dying. Water has become so scarce that women are walking ten or more miles to a polluted river to carry back a dirty drink for their families.

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